A Michigan family of four, all with disabilities, unexpectedly lost some of their health coverage when Obamacare came online last fall, leaving them with $8,000 more in medical bills, The Bay City Times reports.

Ken and Melissa (“Missy”) Davert of Bangor Township are covered under Medicare. Their 15-year-old twins, who have a genetic bone disorder called osteogenesis imperfecta, were covered by private health plans with Blue Cross/Blue Shield. The twins also have a supplemental plan through Michigan’s Department of Community Health, but it helps only with issues linked to the bone disease.

Four months ago, The Times reported Jan. 21, the Daverts received a letter saying the twins’ health plans had been cancelled because they didn’t meet requirements under Obamacare. The Daverts tried twice to enroll on the Obamacare health care exchange, only to be denied the second time. While awaiting their appeal—it could take up to 90 days for a response—they bought private plans directly through Blue Cross/Blue Shield.

“The premiums aren’t an issue for us,” Missy Davert told Times reporter Cole Waterman.  “The premiums under both are essentially the same. What could be costly for us are the out-of-pocket expenses.”

The twins’ old health plans capped combined out-of-pocket expenses at $2,500. The new plans cap them at $10,200.

“It’s great insurance if you don’t have to use it, that’s how I look at it,” Miss Davert said, “but you never know from day to day if you’re going to need it.”

This story was produced by The Foundry’s news team. Nothing here should be construed as necessarily reflecting the views of The Heritage Foundation.